NOTE: Plan to visit early and beat the heat--our last cattle demonstration each day during the summer begins at 2 p.m. The Dinner Belle Cafe is closed. We apologize for the inconvenience.

1830s Jones Stock Farm

Embark on a trip through history with a visit to one of the earliest settlements of Northeast Mexico: the Henry and Nancy Jones Homestead. Interpreters recreate the conversations and daily chores, bringing life to Nancy and Henry Jones’ world – the gardens, farm, livestock, kitchens and homestead. Depending on the season, you might see “family members” tending the garden, caring for the livestock or performing domestic chores such as weaving or corn grinding.  Guests are encouraged to participate, so don’t be surprised if you are put to work in this fully hands-on environment.

  • The Dog-Trot Log Cabin: Explore pioneer living at its finest with this 1830s log-cabin replica. Guests get the opportunity to pick up and touch almost everything at this site which creates a truly immersive experience.
  • Summer Kitchen: Cooking before the modern kitchen could be quite a feat. Visit this outdoor kitchen which was used by the family almost year-round.
  • Stock Farm Outbuildings: A stock farm was only as efficient as the various outbuildings which provided support for the daily operations. Tour the smokehouse, barn, chicken coop and hog pen and learn about these important extensions of the family home.

Jones Family History

More than a decade before the battle at the Alamo, Stephen F. Austin brought 300 families to this part of the Brazos River to settle and establish a new town on the Mexican frontier. Among these brave pioneers were newlyweds Henry and Nancy Stiles Jones from Red River County, Arkansas Territory who joined Austin’s Colony in 1822 and claimed their league of land (4428 acres) in 1824. They raised a family which included twelve children, built both a farming and ranching enterprise and joined the Texians as they fought their way to independence. Through hard work and perseverance, they would begin a legacy that would span over 100 years

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